Brazil Gold: The Musical

26 Aug

It’s 1939 and young Pele Verde is totally oblivious to the World War raging on the other side of the world.  All wants is the hand of his beloved Chinchia in marriage.  But he knows that that can not be since he is but a poor cobbler in a shoeless village.  So, he must leave the little seaside village of Branco.  As he starts on his journey to seek his fortune he sings the sweet I Will No More See the Sun Disappear into the Sea.

Deciding that the only sure way for the unskilled to come up with  a fortune he declares that he will find gold, somehow.  His family blocks his way. He rebuffs their entreaties with the determined (and amazingly educational) The Primary Deposits of Brazilian Gold Remain for the Most Part Untouched.

Pele’ contracts jungle fever the first day out. As he zig-zags (DANCE SEQUENCE) through great swatches of country side he sings the hypnotic Aracariguama, Congonhas, Itapecerica, or Curitiba, It All Looks Greek to Me.

Stumbling upon the Caete’ Mine In Minas Gerais he secures a job when he patches the foreman’s boot. They sing the spritely native based duet,  A Lucky Patch O’ Leather. 

Pele’s youthful ambition inspires the whole work crew.  Singlehandedly his rendition of Four Grams of Gold A Day transforms this ragtag bunch of losers into a gold digging juggernaut.

The future is a shiny gold doubloon until the foreman dies of cyanide poisoning due to the processing of the metal.  As they lower the foreman’s body into the ground Pele’ leads the miners in the haunting All Gold is Fool’s Gold.

Pele’ returns top Branco, a loser, to find that Chinchia has become an international singing star.  Reunited and still in love he becomes her manager and soul mate.  Chinchia sings I Had My Treasure Buried in My Own Backyard, as Pele’ mouths the words and the opening credits of BRAZIL GOLD is projected over the golden couple.

 

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One Response to “Brazil Gold: The Musical”

  1. Jamie September 2, 2011 at 10:20 PM #

    I love your musicals.

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